A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of

A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act II: Publishing as a language

In The merchants of culture, John B. Thompson likens the workings of the book publishing industry to a ‘grammar’. Like Thompson, I here adopt a linguistic metaphor. But I think ‘grammar’ is too restrictive. For the purposes of lateral thinking, we

A theory of book publishing, Act II: Publishing as a language

In The merchants of culture, John B. Thompson likens the workings of the book publishing industry to a ‘grammar’. Like Thompson, I here adopt a linguistic metaphor. But I think ‘grammar’ is too restrictive. For the purposes of lateral thinking, we

A theory of book publishing, Act I: The basic situation

Commissioning content can happen in at least three ways. (I) An author might have an idea and propose it to a publisher. (II) The publisher might have the idea and propose it to an author. Or (III) the author and

A theory of book publishing, Act I: The basic situation

Commissioning content can happen in at least three ways. (I) An author might have an idea and propose it to a publisher. (II) The publisher might have the idea and propose it to an author. Or (III) the author and

A theory of book publishing in five acts: the prologue

When I set up the ‘Towards a theory of publishing‘ page above, I wrote that I was doing so as a substitute for the more extended, rounded, treatment that I could see no immediate prospect of writing. I’m now going

A theory of book publishing in five acts: the prologue

When I set up the ‘Towards a theory of publishing‘ page above, I wrote that I was doing so as a substitute for the more extended, rounded, treatment that I could see no immediate prospect of writing. I’m now going

Denmaur Independent Papers on the choice of paper in publishing: an example of content marketing

Publishers are on the look out for new revenue streams. Content marketing — whereby a business promotes itself, not by telling why their soap suds are better than other companies’, but by telling you some helpful stuff about soap suds

Denmaur Independent Papers on the choice of paper in publishing: an example of content marketing

Publishers are on the look out for new revenue streams. Content marketing — whereby a business promotes itself, not by telling why their soap suds are better than other companies’, but by telling you some helpful stuff about soap suds

The content machine revisited: a critique of Michael Bhaskar’s theory of publishing

My previous post outlines the theory of publishing proposed by Michael Bhaskar in The content machine (Anthem, 2013). According to Bhaskar publishing consists of four phenomena: frames, models, filtering, and amplification. Here I wish to assess the theory. Essentially I

The content machine revisited: a critique of Michael Bhaskar’s theory of publishing

My previous post outlines the theory of publishing proposed by Michael Bhaskar in The content machine (Anthem, 2013). According to Bhaskar publishing consists of four phenomena: frames, models, filtering, and amplification. Here I wish to assess the theory. Essentially I