Circular business: collaborate and circulate

A persistent theme of this blog has been sustainability in business — hence the review of this book, a copy of which was kindly sent to me by one of the co-authors, Nancy Bocken. The bibliographic details are as follows:

Circular business: collaborate and circulate

A persistent theme of this blog has been sustainability in business — hence the review of this book, a copy of which was kindly sent to me by one of the co-authors, Nancy Bocken. The bibliographic details are as follows:

The joy of washi: for World Stationery Day

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). And Wednesday 27th is World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). The post below, reblogged from a previous occasion on Monographer, is the final post in a mini-series

The joy of washi: for World Stationery Day

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). And Wednesday 27th is World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). The post below, reblogged from a previous occasion on Monographer, is the final post in a mini-series

Professionalism in writing: for National Stationery Week (II)

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). Wednesday is World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). This post is designed as the second in a mini-series for the occasion. A doctoral researcher in the department

Professionalism in writing: for National Stationery Week (II)

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). Wednesday is World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). This post is designed as the second in a mini-series for the occasion. A doctoral researcher in the department

Technology for writing: for National Stationery Week (I)

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). Wednesday is, I believe, World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). So here’s what is planned as the first post of a mini-series on writing. Marketing types — and

Technology for writing: for National Stationery Week (I)

The week beginning 25 April is, in the UK at least, National Stationery Week (#natstatweek). Wednesday is, I believe, World Stationery Day (#WorldStationeryDay). So here’s what is planned as the first post of a mini-series on writing. Marketing types — and

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates