Category Archives: Economics of publishing

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts.   Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts.   Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

A theory of publishing: epilogue — book publishing and natural capital

In my previous post (‘A theory of book publishing, Act V: publishing as a capitalist pursuit‘) I analysed book publishing in relation to five types of capital requirement: financial capital technological capital human capital social capital cultural capital Here I

A theory of publishing: epilogue — book publishing and natural capital

In my previous post (‘A theory of book publishing, Act V: publishing as a capitalist pursuit‘) I analysed book publishing in relation to five types of capital requirement: financial capital technological capital human capital social capital cultural capital Here I

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of

A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act I: The basic situation

Commissioning content can happen in at least three ways. (I) An author might have an idea and propose it to a publisher. (II) The publisher might have the idea and propose it to an author. Or (III) the author and

A theory of book publishing, Act I: The basic situation

Commissioning content can happen in at least three ways. (I) An author might have an idea and propose it to a publisher. (II) The publisher might have the idea and propose it to an author. Or (III) the author and