Category Archives: Economics of publishing

The demise of Lion Hudson: j’accuse

On 2 Feb, The Bookseller announced that Lion Hudson had made 35 staff redundant. On the 21st, it reported that the company had gone into administration. As a long-time shareholder (originally of Lion, then of Lion Hudson), this saddens me.

The demise of Lion Hudson: j’accuse

On 2 Feb, The Bookseller announced that Lion Hudson had made 35 staff redundant. On the 21st, it reported that the company had gone into administration. As a long-time shareholder (originally of Lion, then of Lion Hudson), this saddens me.

Bestsellers: review of John Sutherland

Bestsellers (2007) by John Sutherland is published on Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series. There are chapters on definitions, the history of bestsellers in Britain and America, on the modern scene, and commenting on bestseller lists in general. A final chapter,

Bestsellers: review of John Sutherland

Bestsellers (2007) by John Sutherland is published on Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series. There are chapters on definitions, the history of bestsellers in Britain and America, on the modern scene, and commenting on bestseller lists in general. A final chapter,

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts. Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory of

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts. Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory of

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

A theory of publishing: epilogue — book publishing and natural capital

In my previous post (‘A theory of book publishing, Act V: publishing as a capitalist pursuit‘) I analysed book publishing in relation to five types of capital requirement: financial capital technological capital human capital social capital cultural capital Here I

A theory of publishing: epilogue — book publishing and natural capital

In my previous post (‘A theory of book publishing, Act V: publishing as a capitalist pursuit‘) I analysed book publishing in relation to five types of capital requirement: financial capital technological capital human capital social capital cultural capital Here I

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of

A theory of book publishing, Act IV: the question of self-publishing

The advent of (a) digital printing, enabling short-run printing and even print on demand, and (b) ebooks has sharpened the question of what it is that publishers do and how they might add value. Disintermediation (here defined as the elimination of