Category Archives: Editor’s selection

Entrepreneurship as a creative response

Browsing the catalogue of Cambridge’s university library, I searched for books with ‘creative entrepreneurship’ in the title. I was expecting to locate books about running businesses in sectors such as fashion, design, and photography. But my search was for the

Entrepreneurship as a creative response

Browsing the catalogue of Cambridge’s university library, I searched for books with ‘creative entrepreneurship’ in the title. I was expecting to locate books about running businesses in sectors such as fashion, design, and photography. But my search was for the

Why not a master’s in editing?

Many higher education courses — for example, in publishing, creative writing, and journalism — courses provide some coverage of editing. Few, however, give it major emphasis – let alone make it the main focus. Yet the case for providing courses dedicated to editing

Why not a master’s in editing?

Many higher education courses — for example, in publishing, creative writing, and journalism — courses provide some coverage of editing. Few, however, give it major emphasis – let alone make it the main focus. Yet the case for providing courses dedicated to editing

Liverpool Co-op (Pilch Lane Branch), 1955. Image (c) Gordon Cragg, published under Creative Commons licence.

Scholarly publishing: why not co-operatives?

I’m a member of The Co-operative Group. The group, which is the UK’s largest mutual business, is owned  by its customers – over 6 million of them.* The Co-op runs grocery stores, pharmacies, and travel agents and provides a range

Liverpool Co-op (Pilch Lane Branch), 1955. Image (c) Gordon Cragg, published under Creative Commons licence.

Scholarly publishing: why not co-operatives?

I’m a member of The Co-operative Group. The group, which is the UK’s largest mutual business, is owned  by its customers – over 6 million of them.* The Co-op runs grocery stores, pharmacies, and travel agents and provides a range

Learning from other creative industries (IV): the creative director

This is the fourth of a mini-series about the business of interdisciplinary learning amongst creative industries. The job title I use most often to capture my work for our business, The Professional and Higher Partnership, is Creative Director. This term,

Learning from other creative industries (IV): the creative director

This is the fourth of a mini-series about the business of interdisciplinary learning amongst creative industries. The job title I use most often to capture my work for our business, The Professional and Higher Partnership, is Creative Director. This term,

Learning from other creative industries (III): typology of learning

This is the third of a mini-series of posts about the business of interdisciplinary learning amongst creative industries. In last week’s post my previous post in this series I gave a concrete example of interdisciplinary learning, using the occasion of

Learning from other creative industries (III): typology of learning

This is the third of a mini-series of posts about the business of interdisciplinary learning amongst creative industries. In last week’s post my previous post in this series I gave a concrete example of interdisciplinary learning, using the occasion of

Telling the story: creative writing and business models

One of the imprints my company, The Professional and Higher Partnership, publishes is Creative Writing Studies. This brings me into frequent contact with writers of fiction. As a result, I’ve often found myself in conversations concerning the relationship between creativity in (a)

Telling the story: creative writing and business models

One of the imprints my company, The Professional and Higher Partnership, publishes is Creative Writing Studies. This brings me into frequent contact with writers of fiction. As a result, I’ve often found myself in conversations concerning the relationship between creativity in (a)

Giles Gilbert Scott as creative model

Creativity often benefits from models. I’ve written about four models in previous posts: in August 2010 I proposed Harry Beck as a model for authorship; in March 2011 I reflected on Jim Ede as a model for publishing development; and in September

Giles Gilbert Scott as creative model

Creativity often benefits from models. I’ve written about four models in previous posts: in August 2010 I proposed Harry Beck as a model for authorship; in March 2011 I reflected on Jim Ede as a model for publishing development; and in September