Category Archives: Publishing in general

More books on publishing

The audience at my ‘Books on publishing’ talk last week was kind enough to volunteer suggestions of their own. Two suggestions in response to my ‘representations of publishing in fiction’ post script were: Robert Bolano, 2666 PD James, Original sin

More books on publishing

The audience at my ‘Books on publishing’ talk last week was kind enough to volunteer suggestions of their own. Two suggestions in response to my ‘representations of publishing in fiction’ post script were: Robert Bolano, 2666 PD James, Original sin

On not reviewing Frania Hall’s ‘The Business of publishing’

I go to the university library in Cambridge. I ask the library staff to fetch a copy of The business of digital publishing by Frania Hall (Routledge, 2013). I take it home, put on my (recently acquired, perfectly adequate) reading

On not reviewing Frania Hall’s ‘The Business of publishing’

I go to the university library in Cambridge. I ask the library staff to fetch a copy of The business of digital publishing by Frania Hall (Routledge, 2013). I take it home, put on my (recently acquired, perfectly adequate) reading

Publishing out of Africa — and other stories

I was alerted to Alan Hill’s memoir, In pursuit of publishing (John Murray, 1988), by Nana Ayebia Clarke MBE (the Managing Director of Ayebia Clarke Publishing Ltd). The book recounts a remarkable career with Heinemann, centred on the development of Heinemann

Publishing out of Africa — and other stories

I was alerted to Alan Hill’s memoir, In pursuit of publishing (John Murray, 1988), by Nana Ayebia Clarke MBE (the Managing Director of Ayebia Clarke Publishing Ltd). The book recounts a remarkable career with Heinemann, centred on the development of Heinemann

The Art of the Publisher

Roberto Calasso’s The art of the publisher, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon, is published in Britain by Penguin (2015). Tastefully published too, in a dinky little format. It is an assemblage of various occasional pieces, written over several

The Art of the Publisher

Roberto Calasso’s The art of the publisher, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon, is published in Britain by Penguin (2015). Tastefully published too, in a dinky little format. It is an assemblage of various occasional pieces, written over several

Bestsellers: review of John Sutherland

Bestsellers (2007) by John Sutherland is published on Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series. There are chapters on definitions, the history of bestsellers in Britain and America, on the modern scene, and commenting on bestseller lists in general. A final chapter,

Bestsellers: review of John Sutherland

Bestsellers (2007) by John Sutherland is published on Oxford’s Very Short Introduction series. There are chapters on definitions, the history of bestsellers in Britain and America, on the modern scene, and commenting on bestseller lists in general. A final chapter,

On publishing 53 interesting ideas

Under our P&H imprint, we — that is, Frontinus Ltd — publish a series of books called Professional and Higher Education. Each book contains 53 practical ideas. The content concerns various aspects of teaching, learning, and (more recently) research in

On publishing 53 interesting ideas

Under our P&H imprint, we — that is, Frontinus Ltd — publish a series of books called Professional and Higher Education. Each book contains 53 practical ideas. The content concerns various aspects of teaching, learning, and (more recently) research in

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments