Category Archives: Reading

On not reviewing Frania Hall’s ‘The Business of publishing’

I go to the university library in Cambridge. I ask the library staff to fetch a copy of The business of digital publishing by Frania Hall (Routledge, 2013). I take it home, put on my (recently acquired, perfectly adequate) reading

On not reviewing Frania Hall’s ‘The Business of publishing’

I go to the university library in Cambridge. I ask the library staff to fetch a copy of The business of digital publishing by Frania Hall (Routledge, 2013). I take it home, put on my (recently acquired, perfectly adequate) reading

Turning the page: review of Angus Phillips on the evolution of the book

Angus Phillips, Director of the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies, knows a thing or two about books. His publications include The future of the book in the digital age, co-edited with Bill Cope (Chandos, 2006), and Inside book publishing

Turning the page: review of Angus Phillips on the evolution of the book

Angus Phillips, Director of the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies, knows a thing or two about books. His publications include The future of the book in the digital age, co-edited with Bill Cope (Chandos, 2006), and Inside book publishing

CS Lewis, poet?

Last month I published a post on a talk, in Heffers bookshop, by Alister McGrath on CS Lewis. The day after that talk, I attended a reading of CS Lewis’s poetry. The event, featuring Lex Loizides and John Carson, was

CS Lewis, poet?

Last month I published a post on a talk, in Heffers bookshop, by Alister McGrath on CS Lewis. The day after that talk, I attended a reading of CS Lewis’s poetry. The event, featuring Lex Loizides and John Carson, was

They just don’t make bookshops like that anymore…

Monographer writes: I was drawn to this post because the link to it was retweeted by @ToppingsEly. I decided to reblog it here primarily because I just find it engaging – and hope/believe many of the readers of this blog

They just don’t make bookshops like that anymore…

Monographer writes: I was drawn to this post because the link to it was retweeted by @ToppingsEly. I decided to reblog it here primarily because I just find it engaging – and hope/believe many of the readers of this blog

Reading e-books, The phenomenology of

As a reader, I like e-books. I like that: you can acquire them at the very moment you want them; you can personalise them (by adjusting the font size); they tend to cost less than print books; they’re highly portable.

Reading e-books, The phenomenology of

As a reader, I like e-books. I like that: you can acquire them at the very moment you want them; you can personalise them (by adjusting the font size); they tend to cost less than print books; they’re highly portable.

Favorite PUBLISHING brands

So, following Friday’s off-piste post, I’ve been asked, “But what about publishing brands? Which are your favorites?” Well, some of the brands I listed then were in fact publishing brands, at least in part. I refer to the British Library,

Favorite PUBLISHING brands

So, following Friday’s off-piste post, I’ve been asked, “But what about publishing brands? Which are your favorites?” Well, some of the brands I listed then were in fact publishing brands, at least in part. I refer to the British Library,

E-paper: A Tragedy in Three Acts

Act I Sometime around the turn of the century, I attended a meeting at the Society for Authors. A (to my mind nerdy) speaker addressed us on the subject of e-readers. “You need to know about this stuff!” he yelled,

E-paper: A Tragedy in Three Acts

Act I Sometime around the turn of the century, I attended a meeting at the Society for Authors. A (to my mind nerdy) speaker addressed us on the subject of e-readers. “You need to know about this stuff!” he yelled,