Posts Tagged: bibliography

This is not a book

“These days it is impossible to get away from discussions of whether the book will survive the digital revolution. Blogs, tweets and newspaper articles on the subject appear daily…This thought-provoking book takes the form of a conversation in which Carriere

This is not a book

“These days it is impossible to get away from discussions of whether the book will survive the digital revolution. Blogs, tweets and newspaper articles on the subject appear daily…This thought-provoking book takes the form of a conversation in which Carriere

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments

Publishing and bibliography (3): proposal for classifying grey literature

In a previous post, I set out reasons why I believe grey literature will continue to grow in importance: Why do I say that the importance of grey literature will continue to grow? In part, because it harmonises with developments

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates

Old Books and New Histories by Leslie Howsam: a review

What do you do if you want to gain an overview of what book history is, without having to reading much book history. In my case, the answer is to wander into the Blackwell’s in Broad Street, Oxford, browse the bay

Old Books and New Histories by Leslie Howsam: a review

What do you do if you want to gain an overview of what book history is, without having to reading much book history. In my case, the answer is to wander into the Blackwell’s in Broad Street, Oxford, browse the bay

Abstracts for monographs?

There is currently a debate on the role of abstracts in scholarly publishing. The Scholarly Kitchen blog, for example, has called for a reconsideration: “Providing the abstract freely to anyone who wants to use it has become a habit, probably

Abstracts for monographs?

There is currently a debate on the role of abstracts in scholarly publishing. The Scholarly Kitchen blog, for example, has called for a reconsideration: “Providing the abstract freely to anyone who wants to use it has become a habit, probably