Posts Tagged: libraries

This is not a book

“These days it is impossible to get away from discussions of whether the book will survive the digital revolution. Blogs, tweets and newspaper articles on the subject appear daily…This thought-provoking book takes the form of a conversation in which Carriere

This is not a book

“These days it is impossible to get away from discussions of whether the book will survive the digital revolution. Blogs, tweets and newspaper articles on the subject appear daily…This thought-provoking book takes the form of a conversation in which Carriere

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates

Publishing and bibliography (1): signalling the genre

One of the common problems I’ve found with book proposals in professional and academic publishing is that authors don’t always pay enough attention to genre. They often fail to state explicitly what genre a proposed book would fall into. This creates

Academic libraries: what about self-publishing?

There’s been much discussion recently over the role of libraries as publishers. It has focused mostly on two types of publishing programme: (a) making out-of-print texts available again (whether in print or digital format); and (b) enabling authors to publish

Academic libraries: what about self-publishing?

There’s been much discussion recently over the role of libraries as publishers. It has focused mostly on two types of publishing programme: (a) making out-of-print texts available again (whether in print or digital format); and (b) enabling authors to publish

What is the future of scholarly communication?

  The future of scholarly communication (Facet, 2013) is edited by Deborah Shorley and Michael Jubb. It is divided into two parts. The first, longer, part deals with changing researcher behaviour; the second deals with ‘Other players: roles and responsibilities’.

What is the future of scholarly communication?

  The future of scholarly communication (Facet, 2013) is edited by Deborah Shorley and Michael Jubb. It is divided into two parts. The first, longer, part deals with changing researcher behaviour; the second deals with ‘Other players: roles and responsibilities’.

They just don’t make bookshops like that anymore…

Monographer writes: I was drawn to this post because the link to it was retweeted by @ToppingsEly. I decided to reblog it here primarily because I just find it engaging – and hope/believe many of the readers of this blog

They just don’t make bookshops like that anymore…

Monographer writes: I was drawn to this post because the link to it was retweeted by @ToppingsEly. I decided to reblog it here primarily because I just find it engaging – and hope/believe many of the readers of this blog

Developing community-led public libraries

As its authors explain in the introduction, the intent of Developing community-led public libraries: evidence from the UK and Canada (Ashgate, 2013) is to provide a practical road map for library staff to begin integrating and sustaining community-led approaches to libraries.

Developing community-led public libraries

As its authors explain in the introduction, the intent of Developing community-led public libraries: evidence from the UK and Canada (Ashgate, 2013) is to provide a practical road map for library staff to begin integrating and sustaining community-led approaches to libraries.

Personalising library services in higher education

In 2010 Andy Priestner and Elizabeth Tilley (both librarians at the University of Cambridge) published an article entitled ‘Boutique Libraries at your Service’ in Library & Information Update. Its publication was followed by, in turn, a symposium and now this

Personalising library services in higher education

In 2010 Andy Priestner and Elizabeth Tilley (both librarians at the University of Cambridge) published an article entitled ‘Boutique Libraries at your Service’ in Library & Information Update. Its publication was followed by, in turn, a symposium and now this