Posts Tagged: monographs

The Publishing Business: a review

The publishing business: from p-books to e-books by Kelvin Smith (AVA, 2012) is an introductory textbook aimed primarily at students on Publishing Studies courses. Though the book is international in scope, the implied reader is I think UK-based. The book is

The Publishing Business: a review

The publishing business: from p-books to e-books by Kelvin Smith (AVA, 2012) is an introductory textbook aimed primarily at students on Publishing Studies courses. Though the book is international in scope, the implied reader is I think UK-based. The book is

Scholarly and professional publishing: a question of strategy

As a publisher, I’ve often been consulted by researchers pondering the question of whether to write for a scholarly audience, a popular one, or both. Much research is potentially of interest to both types of audience: what then should the

Scholarly and professional publishing: a question of strategy

As a publisher, I’ve often been consulted by researchers pondering the question of whether to write for a scholarly audience, a popular one, or both. Much research is potentially of interest to both types of audience: what then should the

What is the future of scholarly communication?

  The future of scholarly communication (Facet, 2013) is edited by Deborah Shorley and Michael Jubb. It is divided into two parts. The first, longer, part deals with changing researcher behaviour; the second deals with ‘Other players: roles and responsibilities’.

What is the future of scholarly communication?

  The future of scholarly communication (Facet, 2013) is edited by Deborah Shorley and Michael Jubb. It is divided into two parts. The first, longer, part deals with changing researcher behaviour; the second deals with ‘Other players: roles and responsibilities’.

Guaranteed Peer Reviewed Content

I recently met a doctoral researcher in management studies who told me that her supervisor had told her not to cite books in her writing – she was only to cite journal papers. (A third category, namely grey literature, was presumably

Guaranteed Peer Reviewed Content

I recently met a doctoral researcher in management studies who told me that her supervisor had told her not to cite books in her writing – she was only to cite journal papers. (A third category, namely grey literature, was presumably

Naked city – a review

A frequent theme in this blog’s exploration of creativity has been the significance of place. In one post (Creative regions 16 Jan 2012) I drew attention to some of the academic research available on the subject. That post refers specifically

Naked city – a review

A frequent theme in this blog’s exploration of creativity has been the significance of place. In one post (Creative regions 16 Jan 2012) I drew attention to some of the academic research available on the subject. That post refers specifically

Self-publishing: why (or why not) and how

This post summarises a workshop led by Monographer at the 2012 annual conference of the National Association of Writers in Education on 10 November. Context There are many reasons why self-publishing is burgeoning. Some of them are summarised in this post

Self-publishing: why (or why not) and how

This post summarises a workshop led by Monographer at the 2012 annual conference of the National Association of Writers in Education on 10 November. Context There are many reasons why self-publishing is burgeoning. Some of them are summarised in this post

How to publish your PhD: review

I met Sarah Caro at Profile Book’s summer party. For a number of reasons I was interested to hear about her book, How to publish your PhD: a practical guide for the humanities and social sciences: as an academic publisher, I

How to publish your PhD: review

I met Sarah Caro at Profile Book’s summer party. For a number of reasons I was interested to hear about her book, How to publish your PhD: a practical guide for the humanities and social sciences: as an academic publisher, I