Posts Tagged: new product development

Getting started in the creative industries: review of Creative Review

I bought the current (August 2016) edition of Creative Review (CR) because of its focus on getting started in the creative economy. My work as mentor frequently brings me into contact with people wanting guidance in this area. The edition comprises

Getting started in the creative industries: review of Creative Review

I bought the current (August 2016) edition of Creative Review (CR) because of its focus on getting started in the creative economy. My work as mentor frequently brings me into contact with people wanting guidance in this area. The edition comprises

The Art of the Publisher

Roberto Calasso’s The art of the publisher, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon, is published in Britain by Penguin (2015). Tastefully published too, in a dinky little format. It is an assemblage of various occasional pieces, written over several

The Art of the Publisher

Roberto Calasso’s The art of the publisher, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon, is published in Britain by Penguin (2015). Tastefully published too, in a dinky little format. It is an assemblage of various occasional pieces, written over several

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

Publishing and bibliography (2): Beyond ©opyright

The copyright symbol, ©, is well established. Usually, though not invariably, it designates authorship. But what about all the other people who have played a role in originating the book? Films carry extensive credits. Imprint pages, in contrast, credit very few people.

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts.   Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory

A theory of book publishing: synopsis

Anthony Haynes writes: Over the last few weeks I have published a theory of book publishing in the form of a series of blog posts. The post below collates those previous posts.   Prologue When I set up the ‘Towards a theory

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

Learning about publishing: The Publishing Meeting

Anthony Haynes writes: I’ve designed a simulation to use to help people learn about publishing. I designed it originally to be used on training courses for authors and prospective authors. The thinking is: if authors can understand more about how

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of book publishing, Act V: book publishing as a capitalist pursuit

The development of the printing press was a thoroughly capitalist affair. The plant required was expensive: financing it required a large lump sum. Because, in the early days, publishing and printing tended to be combined functions, it follows that publishing

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing

A theory of publishing, Act III: Accounting for diversity

This series of posts is focused on diversity between publishing houses. Why is it that the same book proposal will achieve different outcomes, depending on which houses it is sent to? In the previous post I argued that each publishing