Posts Tagged: open access

Open access: the case of creative writing?

In the first of my previous posts on open access publishing, I mentioned that I was considering establishing an open access programme under our new imprint. That imprint is Creative Writing Studies and is dedicated to publications for scholars, teachers,

Open access: the case of creative writing?

In the first of my previous posts on open access publishing, I mentioned that I was considering establishing an open access programme under our new imprint. That imprint is Creative Writing Studies and is dedicated to publications for scholars, teachers,

Open access: a further response

On 24 October Dr Klaus Graf kindly posted some links in response to my post, ‘Open access publishing revisited’ (13 Oct). So far I have responded to one of the articles that Dr Graf provided links to. Here I’d like

Open access: a further response

On 24 October Dr Klaus Graf kindly posted some links in response to my post, ‘Open access publishing revisited’ (13 Oct). So far I have responded to one of the articles that Dr Graf provided links to. Here I’d like

Open access publishing revisited

Earlier this week (11 Oct) I went to a mini-conference on the future of scholarly publishing organised by the Research Information Network (http://www.rin.ac.uk). Four speakers, all well informed. The discussion was rather dominated by discussion of open access. Not completely

Open access publishing revisited

Earlier this week (11 Oct) I went to a mini-conference on the future of scholarly publishing organised by the Research Information Network (http://www.rin.ac.uk). Four speakers, all well informed. The discussion was rather dominated by discussion of open access. Not completely

Open access (II)

So I welcome the development of open access publishing, as part of a mixed economy. Many of its supporters, however, go further. They argue that open access is a superior form of publishing – even that we would be better

Open access (II)

So I welcome the development of open access publishing, as part of a mixed economy. Many of its supporters, however, go further. They argue that open access is a superior form of publishing – even that we would be better

Open access (I)

Open access publishing offers texts to readers free of charge. The main motives for open access seem to me entirely understandable: authors want to be read; people (authors and their sponsors) want content to be accessible to all. It’s a

Open access (I)

Open access publishing offers texts to readers free of charge. The main motives for open access seem to me entirely understandable: authors want to be read; people (authors and their sponsors) want content to be accessible to all. It’s a